Life in it’s evolutionary perspective is an incomplete measure of success. It judges everything by the criteria of survival and reproduction, with no regard for individual suffering and happiness. Like humans, domesticated chickens and cattle may well be an evolutionary success story, but they are also among the most miserable creatures that ever lived. The domestication of animals was founded on a series of brutal practices that only became crueller with the passing of the centuries.

The natural lifespan of wild chickens is about seven to twelve years, and of cattle about twenty to twenty-five years. In the wild, most chickens and cattle died long before that, but they still had a fair chance of living for a respectable number of years. In contrast, the vast majority of domesticated chickens and cattle are slaughtered at the age of between a few weeks and a few months, because this has always been the optimal slaughtering age from an economic perspective.

Egg-laying hens, dairy cows and draught animals are sometimes allowed to live for many years. But the price is subjugation to a way of
life completely alien to their urges and desires. It’s reasonable to assume,
for example, that bulls prefer to spend their days wandering over open prairies in the company of other bulls and cows rather than pulling carts
and ploughshares under the yoke of a whip-wielding ape. In order to turn bulls, horses, donkeys and camels into obedient draught animals, their natural instincts and social ties had to be broken, their aggression and sexuality contained, and their freedom of movement curtailed. Farmers developed techniques such as locking animals inside pens and cages, bridling them in harnesses and leashes, training them with whips and cattle prods, and mutilating them.

Cows, goats and sheep produce milk only after giving birth to calves, kids and lambs, and only as long as the youngsters are suckling. To continue a supply of animal milk, a farmer needs to have calves, kids or lambs for suckling, but must prevent them from monopolising the milk. One common method throughout history was to simply slaughter the calves and kids shortly after birth, milk the mother for all she was worth, and then get her pregnant again. This is still a very widespread technique. In many modern dairy farms a milk cow usually lives for about five years before being slaughtered. During these five years she is almost constantly pregnant, and is fertilised within 60 to 120 days after giving birth in order to preserve maximum milk production. Her calves are separated from her shortly after birth. The females are reared to become the next generation of dairy cows, whereas the males are handed over to the care of the meat industry.

A modern calf in an industrial meat farm. Immediately after birth the calf is separated from its mother and locked inside a tiny cage not much bigger than the calf’s own body. There the calf spends its entire life – about four months on average. It never leaves its cage, nor is it allowed to play with other calves or even walk – all so that its muscles will not grow strong. Soft muscles mean a soft and juicy steak. The first time the calf has a chance to walk, stretch its muscles and touch other calves is on its way to the slaughterhouse. In evolutionary terms, cattle represent one of the most successful animal species ever to exist. At the same time, they are some of the most miserable animals on
the planet.

Today these animals are often mass-produced in factory-like facilities, their bodies shaped in accordance with industrial needs. They pass their entire lives as cogs in a giant production line, and the length and quality of their existence is determined by the profits and losses of business corporations. Even when the industry takes care to keep them alive, reasonably healthy and well fed, it has no intrinsic interest in the animals social and psychological needs.

They feel strong urges to scout their environment, forage and peck around, determine social hierarchies, build nests and groom themselves. But the egg industry often locks the hens inside tiny coops, and it is not uncommon for it to squeeze four hens to a cage, each given a floor space of about twenty-five by twenty-two centimetres. The hens receive sufficient food, but they are unable to claim a territory, build a nest or engage in other natural activities. Indeed, the cage is so small that hens are often unable even to flap their wings or stand fully erect. Male chicks and imperfect female chicks are picked off the conveyor belt and are then asphyxiated in gas chambers,
dropped into automatic shredders, or simply thrown into the rubbish, where they are crushed to death. Hundreds of millions of chicks die each year in such hatcheries.

Pigs are among the most intelligent and inquisitive of mammals, second perhaps only to the great apes. Yet industrialised pig farms routinely confine nursing sows inside such small crates that they are literally unable to turn around (not to mention walk or forage). The sows are kept in these crates day and night for four weeks after giving birth. Their offspring are then taken away to be fattened up and the sows are
impregnated with the next litter of piglets.

They diary cows live almost all their allotted years inside a small enclosure; standing, sitting and sleeping in their own urine and
excrement. They receive their measure of food, hormones and
medications from one set of machines, and get milked every few hours by another set of machines. The cow in the middle is treated as little
more than a mouth that takes in raw materials and an udder that produces a commodity. Treating living creatures possessing complex emotional worlds as if they were machines is likely to cause them not
only physical discomfort, but also much social stress and psychological
frustration.

Just as the Atlantic slave trade did not stem from hatred towards Africans, so the modern animal industry is not motivated by animosity. Again, it is fuelled by indifference. Most people who produce and consume eggs, milk and meat rarely stop to think about the fate of the chickens, cows or pigs whose flesh and emissions they are eating. Those who do think often argue that such animals are really little different from machines, devoid of sensations and emotions, incapable of suffering. Ironically, the same scientific disciplines which shape our milk machines and egg machines have lately demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that mammals and birds have a complex sensory and emotional make-up. The conclusion was inescapable: animals must have psychological needs and desires that go beyond their material requirements, and if these are not fulfilled, they will suffer greatly!

Around the time that Homo sapiens was elevated to divine status by humanist religions, farm animals stopped being viewed as “life” that could feel pain and distress, and instead came to be treated as machine.

SAPIENS

Yuval Noah Harari

2020©Nagstrong12

All Rights Reserved.

[Images are taken from google]

17 thoughts on “Understanding Life

  1.  I felt bad about myself too that we eat atleast one of them.

    Everything was noted down in the post straight forward. Everyone should go through this.
    👇
    “In evolutionary terms, cattle represent one of the most successful animal species ever to exist.
    Treating living creatures possessing complex emotional worlds as if they were machines is likely to cause them not
    only physical discomfort, but also much social stress and psychological
    frustration.”
    💔

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do this post out of a dissociated state. I’m a meet eater. I believe eating meet is not a sin. But as you did, i also felt bad about myself for being a part of this abuse. Our society should learn to treat animals as a life. Should respect their emotions.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” Gandhi
    “The godly care for their animals, but the wicked are always cruel.” Proverbs 12:10
    New Living Translation
    “Whoever is righteous has regard for the life of his beast, but the mercy of the wicked is cruel.” Proverbs 12:10 English Standard Version
    “The righteous person looks out for the welfare of his livestock, but even the compassion of the wicked is cruel.” Proverbs 12:10 International Standard Version
    “The righteous one is aware of the soul of his animal, and the evil withhold their compassions.”
    Proverbs 12:10 Aramaic Bible in Plain English
    “A righteous person cares [even] about the life of his animals, but the compassion of wicked people is [nothing but] cruelty.” Proverbs 12:10 GOD’S WORD® Translation

    “if it weren’t for a Golden Retriever named Rusty that I got for my children in 2004, I might never have made my journey toward animals. Rusty was the dog everyone should have—loving, playful, and eager to please. He was no Lassie, but he was plenty smart. Before long, Rusty was part of the family.

    Rusty made a convert out of me. He taught me that there are no bad dogs, only bad owners who make dogs, and many other animals, bad. Animals do what they do. They are innocent even in their cruelty because they have no concept of morality. Morality is the territory of humans. We have the knowledge of good and evil, and we can choose between the two.

    Rusty taught me that animals deserve my respect and care. He helped me understand that animals are also uniquely God’s creatures.”……..

    https://erlc.com/resource-library/articles/10-biblical-truths-about-animals/

    Liked by 1 person

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